New Cryptocurrency Release On May 10

New cryptocurrency release on may 10

List article detailing notable cryptocurrencies

The number of cryptocurrencies available over the internet as of 19 August 2018[update] is over 1600 and growing.[1] A new cryptocurrency can be created at any time.[2] By market capitalization, Bitcoin is currently (December 15, 2018) the largest blockchain network, followed by Ripple, Ethereum and Tether.[3]

As of 15 December 2018, total cryptocurrencies market capitalization is $100bn and larger than GDP of 127 countries.[citation needed]

Cryptocurrencies

Active

Below are some notable cryptocurrencies:

Release Currency Symbol Founder(s) Hash algorithmProgramming language of implementation Cryptocurrency blockchain
(PoS, PoW, or other)
Notes
2009 BitcoinBTC,[4] XBT, Satoshi Nakamoto[nt 1]SHA-256d[5][6]C++[7]PoW[6][8]The first and most widely used decentralized ledger currency,[9] with the highest market capitalization.[10]
2011 LitecoinLTC, Ł Charlie Lee ScryptC++[11]PoWOne of the first cryptocurrencies to use Scrypt as a hashing algorithm.

2011 NamecoinNMC Vincent Durham[12][13]SHA-256d C++[14]PoWAlso acts as an alternative, decentralized DNS.

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2012 PeercoinPPC Sunny King
(pseudonym)[citation needed]
SHA-256d[citation needed]C++[15]PoW & PoSThe first cryptocurrency to use POW and POS functions.

2013 DogecoinDOGE, XDG, Ð Jackson Palmer
& Billy Markus[16]
Scrypt[17]C++[18]PoWBased on the Doge internet meme.

2013[citation needed]GridcoinGRC Rob Hälford[citation needed]ScryptC++[19]Decentralized PoSLinked to citizen science through the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing[20]
2013 PrimecoinXPM Sunny King
(pseudonym)[citation needed]
1CC/2CC/TWN[21]TypeScript, C++[22]PoW[21]Uses the finding of prime chains composed of Cunningham chains and bi-twin chains for proof-of-work.

2013 Ripple[23][24]XRP Chris Larsen &
Jed McCaleb[25]
ECDSA[26]C++[27]"Consensus" Designed for peer to peer debt transfer. Not based on bitcoin.

2013 NxtNXT BCNext
(pseudonym)
SHA-256d[28]Java[29]PoSSpecifically designed as a flexible platform to build applications and financial services around its protocol.

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2014 AuroracoinAUR Baldur Odinsson
(pseudonym)[30]
ScryptC++[31]PoWCreated as an alternative currency for Iceland, intended to replace the Icelandic króna.

2014 DashDASH Evan Duffield &
Kyle Hagan[32]
X11C++[33]PoW & Proof of Service[nt 2]A bitcoin-based currency featuring instant transactions, decentralized governance and budgeting, and private transactions.
2014 NEONEO Da Hongfei & Erik Zhang SHA-256 & RIPEMD160C#[34]dBFTChina based cryptocurrency, formerly ANT Shares and ANT Coins.

The names were changed in 2017 to NEO and GAS.

2014 MazaCoinMZC BTC Oyate Initiative SHA-256d C++[35]PoWThe underlying software is derived from that of another cryptocurrency, ZetaCoin.
2014 MoneroXMR Monero Core Team CryptoNight[36]C++[37]PoWPrivacy-centric coin using the CryptoNote protocol with improvements for scalability and decentralization.

2014 NEMXEM UtopianFuture (pseudonym) SHA3-512Java[38]POI The first hybrid public/private blockchain solution built from scratch, and first to use the Proof of Importance algorithm using EigenTrust++ reputation system.

2014 PotCoinPOT Potcoin core dev team ScryptC++[39]PoSDeveloped to service the legalized cannabis industry in the United States.
2014 TitcoinTIT Edward Mansfield & Richard Allen[40]SHA-256d TypeScript, C++[41]PoWThe first cryptocurrency to be nominated for a major adult industry award.[42]
2014 VergeXVG Sunerok Scrypt, x17, groestl, blake2s, and lyra2rev2 C, C++[43]PoWFeatures anonymous transactions using Tor.

2014 StellarXLM Jed McCalebStellar Consensus Protocol (SCP) [44]C, C++[45]Stellar Consensus Protocol (SCP) [44]Open-source, decentralized global financial network.

2014 VertcoinVTC Bushido Lyra2RE[46]C++[47]PoWAims to be ASIC resistant.
2015 Ether or "Ethereum" ETH Vitalik Buterin[48]Ethash[49]C++, Go[50]PoWSupports Turing-complete smart contracts.

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2015 Ethereum ClassicETC Ethash[49]PoWAn alternative version of Ethereum[51] whose blockchain does not include the DAO Hard-fork.[52] Supports Turing-complete smart contracts.
2015 TetherUSDT Jan Ludovicus van der Velde[53]Omnicore[54]PoWTether claims to be backed by USD at a 1 to 1 ratio.

The company has been unable to produce promised audits.[55]

2016 ZcashZEC Zooko WilcoxEquihashC++[56]PoWThe first open, permissionless financial system employing zero-knowledge security.

2017 Bitcoin CashBCH[57]SHA-256d PoWHard fork from Bitcoin, Increased Block size from 1mb to 8mb
2017 EOS.IOEOS Dan LarimerWebAssembly, Rust, C, C++[58]delegated PoSFeeless Smart contract platform for decentralized applications and decentralized autonomous corporations with a block time of 500 ms.[58]

Inactive

Notes

  1. ^It is not known whether the name "Satoshi Nakamoto" is real or a pseudonym, nor whether it represents one person or a group.
  2. ^Via Masternodes containing 1000 DASH held as collateral for "Proof of Service".

    Through an automated voting mechanism, one Masternode is selected per block and receives 45% of mining rewards.

See also

References

  1. ^"All Cryptocurrencies | Coinlore".

    coinlore.com. Retrieved August 19, 2018.

  2. ^Cryptocurrencies: A Brief Thematic Review. Economics of Networks Journal. Social Science Research Network (SSRN).

    Top 10 cryptocurrency 2017

    Date accessed August 28, 2017.

  3. ^"All Currencies | CryptoCurrency Market Capitalizations". Coinmarketcap.com. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  4. ^Dixon, Lance (December 24, 2013). "Building Bitcoin use in South Florida and beyond". Miami Herald.

    New cryptocurrency release on may 10

    Retrieved January 24, 2014.

  5. ^Taylor, Michael Bedford (2013). "Bitcoin and the age of bespoke silicon"(PDF). Proceedings of the 2013 International Conference on Compilers, Architectures and Synthesis for Embedded Systems. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press. ISBN . Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  6. ^ abSteadman, Ian (May 7, 2013). "Wary of Bitcoin?

    Zerodha options trading video

    A guide to some other crypto currencies". Wired UK. Condé Nast UK.

  7. ^"Bitcoin on GitHub".
  8. ^Hobson, Dominic (2013). "What is Bitcoin?". XRDS: Crossroads, The ACM Magazine for Students. 20 (1). Association for Computing Machinery. pp. 40–44. doi:10.1145/2510124. ISSN 1528-4972.
  9. ^Reynard, Cherry (May 25, 2018).

    "What are the top 10 cryptocurrencies?". The Telegraph. Retrieved October 15, 2018.

  10. ^Kharpal, Arjun (February 6, 2018).

    "Over $550 billion of value wiped off cryptocurrencies since their record high just under a month ago". CNBC. Retrieved October 15, 2018.

  11. ^"Litecoin on GitHub".
  12. ^"vinced/namecoin: Vince's tree – see namecoin/namecoin for main integration tree". GitHub. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  13. ^Keller, Levin (March 19, 2011). "Namecoin – a distributed name system based on Bitcoin".

    New cryptocurrency release on may 10

    Prezi.

  14. ^"Namecoin on GitHub". Retrieved February 4, 2018.
  15. ^"Peercoin on GitHub".
  16. ^A History of Dogecoin. Dogecoin Analysis Report.

    Social Science Research Network (SSRN). Accessed December 28, 2017.

  17. ^"Intro – Dogecoin # Technical specifications". Dogeco.in.

    CCG Newsletter

    Retrieved December 14, 2013.

  18. ^"Dog E Coin on GitHub".
  19. ^"GridCoin on GitHub".
  20. ^Halford, Rob.

    "Gridcoin: Crypto-Currency using Berkeley Open Infrastructure Network Computing Grid as a Proof Of Work"(PDF). Retrieved April 11, 2016.

  21. ^ ab"FAQ · primecoin/primecoin Wiki · GitHub". Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  22. ^"Primecoin on GitHub".
  23. ^Chayka, Kyle (July 2, 2013).

    "What Comes After Bitcoin?". Pacific Standard. Retrieved January 18, 2014.

  24. ^Vega, Danny (December 4, 2013). "Ripple's Big Move: Mining Crypto currency with a Purpose".

    Seattlepi.com. Hearst Seattle Media, LLC, a division of The Hearst Corporation.

  25. ^Simonite, Tom (April 11, 2013). "Big-name investors back effort to build a better Bitcoin". MIT Technology Review. Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  26. ^"How it works – Ripple Wiki".

    Retrieved January 20, 2014.

  27. ^"Rippled on GitHub".
  28. ^"NXT Whitepaper". NxtWiki – Whitepaper. Archived from the original on February 3, 2015. Retrieved December 21, 2014.
  29. ^"NXT on Bitbucket".
  30. ^Casey, Michael J. (March 5, 2014).

    New cryptocurrency release on may 10

    "Auroracoin already third-biggest cryptocoin–and it's not even out yet". The Wall Street Journal.

  31. ^"Auroracoin on GitHub".
  32. ^Scharr, Jill (May 28, 2014).

    "What is Dash?

    New cryptocurrency release on may 10

    An FAQ". Tom's Guide.

  33. ^"Dash on GitHub".
  34. ^"NEO on GitHub".
  35. ^"MazaCoin on GitHub".
  36. ^"CryptoNight – Bitcoin Wiki". En.bitcoin.it. June 19, 2014. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  37. ^"Monero on GitHub".
  38. ^"NEM on GitHub".
  39. ^"PotCoin on GitHub".
  40. ^Mercier Voyer, Stephanie.

    "Titcoin Is a Brand New Cryptocurrency for Porn Purchases". Vice Magazine. Retrieved June 18, 2014.

  41. ^"Titcoin on GitHub".
  42. ^"Titcoin Receives Two Web & Tech XBIZ Nominations". Payout Magazine. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  43. ^"Verge on GitHub".
  44. ^ ab"Stellar.org White Papers"(PDF).

    TOP 4 ALTCOINS TO BUY NOW!! Best Cryptocurrencies to Invest in Q3 2019! [Bitcoin News]

    Stellar.org.

  45. ^"Stellar on GitHub".
  46. ^"Lyra2RE – A new PoW algorithm for an ASIC-free future"(PDF). November 29, 2014.
  47. ^"Vertcoin on GitHub".
  48. ^"Out in the Open: Teenage Hacker Transforms Web Into One Giant Bitcoin Network". Wired.com. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  49. ^ ab"Ethash".

    Github.com. Retrieved July 24, 2017.

  50. ^"Ethereum on GitHub".
  51. ^"README/README.md at master".

    Bitcoin investing and trading 101

    Github.com. Retrieved July 24, 2017.

  52. ^Adinolfi, Joseph. "Exclusive: Grayscale launches digital-currency fund backed by Silver Lake's co-founder Hutchins".

    New cryptocurrency release on may 10

    MarketWatch. Retrieved April 27, 2017.

  53. ^"Mystery Shrouds Tether". Bloomberg. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  54. ^""Tether White Paper""(PDF). Tether. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  55. ^Leising, Matthew (June 20, 2018).

    "Tether Hired Former FBI Director's Law Firm to Vet Finances". Bloomberg.

    The place for all your new cryptocurrencies and cryptocoin needs !

    Retrieved June 25, 2018.

  56. ^"Zcash on GitHub".
  57. ^"Bitcoin Cash Markets and Dillema". CryptoCoinCharts. Retrieved September 14, 2017.
  58. ^ ab"Documentation: EOS.IO Documents". February 10, 2018 – via GitHub.
  59. ^Ray, Tiernan (January 9, 2018).

    Introduction to Cryptomoney and cryptocoin

    "Kodak CEO: Blockchain Significant, Though Not a Doubling in Stock Price". Barrons. Retrieved January 11, 2018.

  60. ^"Onix's white paper"(PDF). www.onixcoin.com.

    New cryptocurrency release on may 10

    January 13, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.

  61. ^"OnixCoin on GitHub".
  62. ^Ellsworth, Brian (August 30, 2018). "Special Report: In Venezuela, new cryptocurrency is nowhere to be found".

    New Cryptocurrency Regulations to Come Up in Early 2020

    Reuters. Retrieved August 30, 2018.

Market capitalizations of cryptocurrencies as of January 27, 2018